Welcome to Finland

Finland is a modern country that offers exceptional quality of life and blazingly fast, affordable and unlimited internet. The summer is short but sweet and the winters are nowhere near as bad as the legends would have it. The country is safe and clean, politically stable and least corrupt, a place where human rights and equality are valued.

Photo by Jussi Hellsten

Hard Cold Facts

Finland is the home of Max Payne and Alan Wake, but also the origin of Angry Birds, Clash of Clans and Clash Royale.

Population of Finland is 5.5 million. Capital city of Helsinki holds 616.690, capital region totals at 1.6 million.

The high quality of life in Finland comes at a cost, but it’s still more affordable than e.g. in Sweden, Denmark, UK or France.

Days start getting shorter at the end of June, nightless nights turn into polar nights with snowfall making them brighter.

Helsinki has mild summers around 15°C with heatwaves going up to 30°C, winters around -4°C with occasional drops to -15°C.

Finnish is considered the second most difficult language in the world! But don’t worry, Finns speak excellent English.

Finland beat its eternal rival Sweden in Men’s World Ice Hockey Championships 4–1 on their home turf back in 1995.

Latest news from Yle News and more facts at Visit Finland.

Photo by Eetu Ahanen

Life in Finland

SAUNA is an essential part of life in Finland – it’s not a myth! Flats often have their own sauna or a shared one in the apartment building. You can also enjoy an after-work sauna at the office since Remedy has one, as do most Finnish companies.

CUISINE in Finland is comparably basic but delicious, containing root vegetables, fish, game, berries, mushrooms, wholesome breads and tasty pastries. Finnish food innovations such as pulled oats and broad beans are tasty and healthy vegan alternatives to meat – and they’re taking over the world!

LONKERO, a mix of grapefruit flavored soda and gin, is something unique to Finland. Originally launched at the Olympic Games in 1952, this long drink has since become an option on tap in every bar next to beers and ciders. Did you know that we also have the world’s best G&T gin Napue?

DRESSING yourself right is important – and we don’t mean suits and ties! Winters get bitterly cold but the climate is quite dry, so when you dress right, you’re ready to go. Get some good gloves, warm shoes and a beanie as your basic winter uniform. There’s a great layering guide for Finnish winters.

STORES in Finland are open daily, even on Sundays. There are only a few public holidays that affect opening hours, but cities have several 24/7 stores where you can get anything 365 days a year.

FINNS are a quieter folk in general, some say they take some time to warm up to you – but that’s what sauna is for. If you want to learn about what terrifies the Finns, check out Finnish Nightmares and Very Finnish Problems.

CRIME RATE is low in Helsinki and Finland in general. It’s safe to walk the streets by night, and quite many leave their houses unlocked in the countryside.

INTERNET is reliable, affordable and fast – both mobile and broadband. A phone contract with unlimited data at 50 Mb/s starts from about 15 € per month. The use of mobile data is the highest in the world.

BIG EVENTS like Nordic Business Forum and Slush have shaped Helsinki as the hub for the tech and start-up scene in Europe (or maybe even the world). There are several reasons why Helsinki brings the best business together.

Photo by Pekka Keränen

Getting Around

METRO connects Remedy’s studio with the rest of the greater Helsinki area. Getting around in the capital is easy and its extensive public transportation network is reliable. Almost everything in downtown Helsinki is within a walking distance.

CITY BIKES are affordable and available from May to October. Helsinki is very biker friendly. The majority of the population uses public transportation to get to work. Whether sitting on a bus, train or tram, Finns usually enjoy silence and personal space. No small talk required!

CARS aren’t a necessity as traveling around Finland is easy in general. On the other hand car and gasoline expenses are quite high. Car rental services such as DriveNow and Hertz are available if you want to venture to the countryside outside the public transportation network.

AIRPORT at Helsinki-Vantaa is the hub for countless international destinations with great direct connections. Helsinki is a 2–3 hour flight away from most European hotspots such as London, Paris and Berlin. The city is also a key connector to Asia as it’s the shortest way from northern Europe.

Photo by Jussi Hellsten

Working Culture and Education

WORK HARD, PLAY HARDER. Finns are diligent and disciplined, but life outside of work is of great importance. Nobody looks at you with evil eyes at work when you come back from your four-week vacation. Taking time out and looking after yourself is just as important as doing a great job.

STANDARD WORKDAY is 8 hours and flextime is a common practice, meaning that you can check in to the studio between 7 am and 10 pm. Standard holiday accumulation is 25 days per year, and in addition we have 13 national public holidays. You also get a day off for moving. All holidays are paid.

WORKING ENVIRONMENT AND CULTURE are unique with a low hierarchy in management and a big focus on employee wellbeing. For example sick leaves are not deducted from holidays. Finns tend to be quiet and workplaces rarely feature shouting matches, but that’s not to say Finns are not passionate.

AFFORDABLE HIGH QUALITY EDUCATION in the greater Helsinki area is available at Aalto University, Helsinki University and universities of applied sciences Haaga-Helia, Metropolia and Laurea. Study leave and company-paid individual courses can be discussed with your supervisor.

Photo by University of Helsinki

Eating and Going Out

LUNCH HOUR start as early as 10.30 and usually consists of a hearty meal. Affordable lunch offers are available at pretty much every restaurant. Company lunch benefit means that you can top up tax-free credit on a lunch benefit card and use it wherever you want.

RESTAURANT SCENE in Helsinki is evolving constantly and there’s something for everyone. The quality of dining, whether it’s fine or street-level, has skyrocketed in Finland during the past ten years. Eating out can be quite expensive, but cheaper bistro-style menus have become more common.

TIPS AND LISTS: White Guide Nordic for a list of the best restaurants in the country. Spotted by Locals is where locals share their favorite places to go, eat and drink. MyHelsinki, Helsinki State of Mind and Helsinki This Week curate lists of things to see and eat.

CULTURAL HOTSPOTS to check out for gigs, movies, food and events are meatpacking district Teurastamo, old tram workshop Korjaamo and old town’s Torikorttelit. There’s also the old train warehouse Konepajan Bruno managed by the previous U.S. Ambassador to Finland Bruce Oreck.

PARTY CITY Helsinki offers an abundance of clubs, concert venues and art exhibitions. Ballet and opera are considered mainstream art, not elite entertainment. Tickets are affordable, the setting is casual and the quality world-class.

CAPITAL OF METAL with Tuska, but Helsinki also hosts other world-renowned festivals such as Flow, Weekend and Helsinki International Film Festival.

AMAZING BARS AND PUBS offer top-notch drinks, make sure to visit Stadin Panimo and Bryggeri Helsinki as well as cocktail bars Liberty or Death, A21 and Tislaamo. If you want to stick to water, Finland has one of the best in the world and is drinkable straight from the tap.

TOO FANCY FOR YOU? Don’t worry, we also got a bunch of great fast food joints offering the finest burgers, pizzas as well as Middle Eastern and Mexican food there is… in Finland.

FEELING LAZY? Wolt and Foodora deliver right to your door. ResQ offers affordable and tasty meals from restaurant leftovers.

Photo by Samuli Pentti

Life Happens Outdoors

Finland is not called Funland for nothing! There’s plenty to see and do here, especially if you’re into winter sports and nature. We might not be a globally famous tourist attraction such as London, Paris or our dear neighbor Stockholm, but we’re getting there.

FINLANDIZATION: Remedy organizes monthly events for foreign employees and their families. The aim is to get you more familiar with Finland, life in Helsinki, experience local traditions, culture and at the same time have some great fun with your co-workers.

ARCHIPELAGO OF HELSINKI has more than 600 islands which are easy to get to and perfect for activities like kayaking and stand-up paddling. City beaches like Hietaniemi or the recreational islands Uunisaari, Lonna and Pihlajasaari are vacation spots just 20 minutes from the city center.

NATIONAL PARKS Nuuksio and Sipoo surround Helsinki and are great day trip destinations for hikes, swims and silence. The everyman’s right gives nature to everyone. You can freely pick berries, mushrooms and camp almost anywhere you like.

CITY PARKS like Keskuspuisto and the Töölönlahti bay area are pure nature right in the heart of the city. Linnanmäki amusement park and the Korkeasaari Zoo are great options for a family day.

GET A MOVE ON! Indoor and outdoor climbing, paddling, running, cycling, swimming, affordable sports activities and gym memberships – Helsinki has it all for each season. There’s also a free private gym at the Remedy studio.

Photo by Jussi Hellsten

Relocating to Finland

Once you accept Remedy’s job offer, it’s time for us to start moving you and any spouse, children and pets you might bring along to Finland. Our hands-on assistant will be there every step of the way; answering, guiding and scheduling you through the relocation process.

After landing in Finland, we’ll take you from the airport to free temporary accommodation. Then it’s time to find a permanent home, and we’ll assist with finding an apartment of your preference in a good area. We’ll also assist with negotiating the contract and getting to know the neighborhood.

We’ll make tackling the bureaucracy a breeze by supporting you through the immigration formalities, residency permits and tax authorities. We’ll also help you set up everyday necessities from telephone and internet subscriptions to bank accounts and public transport passes.

After everything is set up and you’re ready for your first day at Remedy, we’ll continue to support you and help with questions about the customs, traditions and living in Finland in general. If necessary, you’ll also get guidance on daycare and education.

Photo by Jussi Hellsten